Category Archives: Precarious Work

Affected workers call for implementation of DOLE’s regularization order, Bats for the issuance of EO that will prohibit contracting

Photo by: Del Banares/Sentro

Workers from across industries are appealing to the government for the immediate implementation of previous Department of Labor and Employment’s order for regularization and has called on their respective companies to follow the example of set by fast food giant Jollibee as it recently agreed to regularize its contractual workers.
“We laud the decision of Jollibee’s management to fully comply with DOLE’s decision,” Benedict Murillo, a leader of Respect Fast Food Workers’ Alliance, said. “We urge the company to enjoin its all franchises to do the same,” he added.

A total of 2,488 employees of Sofitel, Manila Peninsula, Holiday Inn Makati, Fairmont and Raffles, Dusit Thani Manila, New World Renaissance, Manila Pavillion have been anxiously waiting for their regularization as ordered by DOLE on separate occasions.
According to Daniel L. Edralin, Secretary General of the National Union of Workers in Hotel Restaurant and Allied Industries (NUWHRAIN), his group has requested labor inspections to a total of 10 hotels, “but only seven inspections actually took place, with a dismal compliance rate on the part of the companies.”

“Based on our records, compliance to the DOLE’s order only happened in Dusit Thani and Manila Peninsula, although there are still workers due for regularization,” Edralin explained.
In an inspection in February last year, DOLE-NCR found that some 200 employees of Sual Power Plant are due for regularization but the workers are still waiting for the compliance order despite formally writing to DOLE-NCR on four separate occasions. This according to Roman Dastas of Workers’ Solidarity Network (WSN).

May Flor Palad of Pinagisang Tinig at Lakas ng Anak Pawis (PIGLAS) said that in HAMLIN, a garment company that is part of the supply chain of various global brands, the labor department ordered the company to comply in February last year, with close to 1,000 workers due for regularization. The order remains unimplemented and some workers were actually dismissed by the management after attempting to invoke the order.

Photo By: Del Banares/Sentro

According to Rodel Abenoja of SENTRO Davao, the Sky Cable’s branches in the cities of Tagum and Davao were found by DOLE guilty of the prohibited labor only contracting and a total of 77 employees should have been regularized on July 27, 2018. The order remains unimplemented.
In the case of PEPSI in Davao, DOLE has claimed compliance by the management which would have benefitted 85 workers but according to Sentro, the union in that branch did not receive compliance order and the region’s DOLE office failed to provide a copy of the compliance order when asked by the union for a copy.

According to Josua Mata, Secretary General of Sentro, the long delayed implementation proves that DOLE’s regulatory framework does not work.

“The biggest problem is that companies would generally challenge DOLE’s decisions in courts. This shows DO174 is failing to deliver Duterte’s promise,” Mata said.
In general, employers are given only 10 days from receipt of inspection results with findings of violations to correct violations of labor standards.

The labor leader explained that this is the reason why SENTRO and NAGKIASA, together with KMU and other labor groups, are calling for the issuance of an EO that would correct DO 174.
“That EO should veer away from regulating contractualization and instead work for prohibiting it, of course with some exemptions to be agreed upon,” he explained, adding that a watered down EO that DOLE and the Department of Trade and Industry has been planning will not repair the leaks of the DO 147.

Unfortunately, after more than 2 years, the president has been hemming and hawing over the issuance of an Executive Order that will signal the government’s resolve to prohibit contractualization with some exemptions.

DOLE announced that an EO would finally be signed in Malacañang on 16 April 2018.
However, Mata said that SENTRO leaders will not attend the event in Malacañang on 16 April 2018 unless it is clear that the EO to be signed is labor’s version and not the one peddled by DOLE and DTI which would only perpetuate the flawed DO 174. “SENTRO stands by NAGKAISA’s decision not to be a party to a sellout,” Mata said.

NAGKAISA is the broadest labor coalition in the country. NUWHRAIN, WSN, PIGLAS and Respect Fast Food Workers are affiliates of SENTRO.#

Statement of SENTRO F&B on the violent picket dispersal of workers in COCA-COLA FEMSA Philippines

We, the officers and members of the Sentro ng mga Nagkakaisa at mga Progresibong
Manggagawa Food and Beverage Council (SENTRO F&B), together with its various union
affiliates all over the Philippines, condemn in the strongest possible terms the violent dispersal of
a peaceful picket staged, on April 2, 2018, by, more or less, eighty (80) workers of the COCA-
COLA FEMSA Philippines, Inc. to protest their malevolent, oppressive, repressive and arbitrary
dismissal from their respective works, leaving their respective families in economic limbo.

About ten (10) picketing workers, who participated in the picket, were also arrested by police
officers who barged into the workers’ picket lines in blatant violation the joint guidelines issued
by the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), Department of Interior and Local
Government (DILG), Department of National Defense (DND), Department of Justice (DOJ), the
Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and Philippine National Police (PNP).

The Guidelines mandate, among others, military and police elements to stay fifty (50) meters
away from the picket lines and to exercise utmost neutrality in the prevailing labor feuds
between the workers and the company, and not to unnecessarily disrupt the exercise of the
workers of their constitutional right to peaceably assemble for redress of their grievances. Labor pickets are constitutional tool that the workers can use to balance the power landscape between the workers and owners of capital.

The violent dispersal of the peaceful pickets of the dismissed COCO-COLA workers, and the
consequential arrest of some of them, is a blatant of violation of a constitutional injunction which mandates the state and its instruments, like the military, the police and the city government of Davao, to give full protection to labor, organized and unorganized, being a primary social and economic force.

These high-handed, arrogant and illegal actions of the police, with the imprimatur of Davao City Mayor Sarah Duterte-Carpio, deserve strong condemnations from all well-meaning sections of society, owing to the fact that these dubious actions are perpetrated through the orders of a public official who postures in public to be pro-poor and to be protective of the welfare and interests of the masses.

It is not true, as we are made to believe by government authorities, that the picketing workers are the employees of the Work Experts and Allied Services, Inc., which is notoriously known in
Davao City to be illegally operating as a labor-only contracting agency. The picketing workers,
having been victims of labor-only contracting and as workers who are performing works which
are necessary and desirable to the business or trade of the company are deemed regular workers of this same company, in this case, by COCO-COLA, by operations of law, not with standing existence of a work contract to the contrary (Purefoods vs. NLRC).

The proper thing that Davao City Mayor Sarah Duterte-Carpio should have done, as one who
publicly professes her love for the workers and as the daughter of the President of the Republic
who promised to kill the capitalist who oppressed the workers, was to facilitate the honest-to-
goodness dialogue between COCA-COLA and the hapless workers. On the contrary, however,
City Mayor Sarah Duterte-Carpio showed her real color by ordering the violent dispersal of the
picketing workers, and the arrest of some of them, for the purpose of filing criminal charges
against them.

By her acts, Sarah Duterte-Carpio has proven to the world that she is not different from any other elected officials who are pro-capitalist trapos, but who cleverly hide their true character behind the sterling curtains of their pro-poor rhetoric and cosmetic programs and projects. Good for her!

But the workers’ dream for a humane and dignified life will not die. The fate that befalls them
during this fateful day in Davao City will keep the fire burning in their hearts and minds. It will
serve as the propelling force which will prod them to finally cut the chain that ties them from
poverty and unfreedom for so long a time.

Organise! Fight! Win!

Time is up: The buck stops now with the President on the issue of endo

PRESS STATEMENT
NAGKAISA! Labor Coalition
28 February 2018

Contractualization was a top billing issue during the 2016 presidential election. And it was the President who made a campaign promise that the moment he becomes the Chief Executive, contractualization will stop. The trade union movement responded with enthusiasm and accorded the President the courtesy and latitude of managing his plans by participating in all the summits, workshops, and dialogues organized by the government on this issue.

Several times he asked leaders of Nagkaisa labor coalition that he be given more time to realize his pledge – the first was on February 27, 2017; then on May 1, 2017; and the last was on February 7, 2018 where he asked for another extension until March 15. On these occasions, President Duterte would always say that contractualization is anti-labor and anti poor as it brings in hardship and poverty upon millions of our workers.

Furthermore, it was also the President who asked Nagkaisa leaders during the Labor Day dialogue held in Davao last year to draft within 10 days an Executive Order (EO) that he can sign to correct the labor-rejected Department Order 174 issued by the Department of Labor and Empoyment (DOLE) in March last year and to rectify the more than two decades of failed framework of regulation. Nagkaisa religiously complied with all these processes and waited for the final response of the President.

Now, a few days before his self-imposed deadline and the President is no longer asking for time and more drafts but for a compromise. The buck stops now with President Duterte. The labor-drafted EO which seeks to bring back direct hiring and institutionalize prohibition as the general rule on contractualization but recognizes that there are types of jobs that can be contracted out as along as it passes through consultation with the National Tripartite and Industrial Peace Council (NTIPC) is the fairest middle ground or “compromise” that labor can take. A watered-down version of an EO is unacceptable.

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Strike Looms in Coca-Cola as company threatens destruction of jobs

Photo by Jun Santos

Today, at least a hundred workers belonging to various unions working together under the banner of the Coalition of All Coca-Cola Workers’ Unions and their allies, swooped down on the headquarters of Coca-Cola FEMSA Philippines Incorporated (CCFPI) at Netlima in Bonifacio Global City, to once again protest the company’s plan to destroy more than 600 regular jobs, including union leaders, many of whom are young workers.

“Coca-Cola claims to be the No. 1 soft drinks company in the country, and yet, by busting the union, Coca-Cola is acting like the worst corporate thug,” the coalition said in its statement. “We have no recourse but to take strike action,” the coalition said.

In an overwhelming fashion, workers in TRCI voted last 23 February 2018 to go on strike. Meanwhile, most of the sales force unions have filed their respective Notices of Strike.

Twenty-three of those to be laid-off are union leaders, including four union presidents.  CCFPI claims that the lay-offs are being done to develop its new business model in order to conform to the challenges in the industry and the larger economic environment.

The CCFPI management and the Federation and Cooperation of Cola, Beverage, and Allied Industry Unions (FCCU-SENTRO/IUF) had an agreement which requires the management to hold discussions with the union on labor relations issues, including violations of international guidelines for industrial and labor relations like the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises. The restructuring and mass lay-off on are outright violations of the above. This is outright, unabashed union busting. The lay-offs are nothing but CCFPI destroying jobs and people’s lives.

The CCFPI management uses the implementation of the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion (TRAIN) as a façade for their union busting. The workers and their families are not gullible to accept such elementary reasoning and alibi.

The Coalition of All Coca-Cola Workers’ Unions calls on the DOLE to hold the CCFPI management accountable for their callous decision to destroy their workers’ jobs. The Coalition also demands for the CFFPI management to present concrete evidence for the need to restructure and let workers be consulted in any action related to this. The Coalition also demands a joint agreement with the management that will assure them that there will be no restructuring without negotiation with our unions.

Oppose Coke’s blatant disregard for workers’ rights! 

No to Contractualization!

Stand with the Coalition of All Coca-Cola Workers’ Unions!

WORKERS SLAM MASSIVE LAY-OFF OF 600 WORKERS IN COCA-COLA FEMSA PHILIPPINES INC.,

MANILA, PHILIPPINES – No less than 1,500 workers from the Federation and Cooperation of Cola, Beverage, and Allied Industry Unions (FCCU-SENTRO/IUF) held a synchronized picket protest early this morning in Canlubang, Iligan, Iloilo, and other Coke bottling plants and offices condemning the sudden massive lay-off of 600 workers of Coca-Cola FEMSA Philippines Inc., (CCFPI), the largest franchised bottler of Coca-Cola products in the Philippines.

According to a statement released by the FCCU-SENTRO/IUF, the retrenchment of these workers came without warning “while leaders of [of the union] were holding a meeting with the management of CCFPI” (habang nakikipag pulungan ang mga lider ng [unyon] sa management ng CCFPI). The union added that the company never informed the union that there will be changes in the business model of CCFPI, which, the company alleges, is the reason for the retrenchment.

Alfredo Maranon, National President of FCCU-SENTRO/IUF, states that the action of the CCFPI management violates the company’s obligations under the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines as well as the UN Global Compact of which The Coca-Cola Company in Atlanta is a signatory. According to these agreements, he adds, the company must hold talks with the union in order to “process the negative results on workers’ jobs and livelihood” (maagapan ang mga negatibong resulta sa trabaho at kabuhayan ng mga manggagawa).

The FCCU-SENTRO/IUF is set to hold more mobilizations until CCFPI heeds their demand to stop the termination of workers in the company and to sit down in a meeting with the union about the company’s restructuring program.– END

The FCCU-SENTRO/IUF is a member of the IUF Global Coca-Cola Workers’ Alliance, the Sentro ng Nagkakaisa at mgaProgresibongManggagawa (SENTRO), and the International Union of Food, Agricultural, Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco, and Allied Workers’ Associations

Nagkaisa hails passage of Security of Tenure Bill

Labor Coalition Nagkaisa! is satisfied over the passage on third reading of HB 6908 on the Security of Tenure at the House of Representatives.

Nagkaisa! said that “the SOT bill is a great improvement to existing legislation as it gives more teeth to the government by providing penalties for those who will violate the security of tenure laws.”

“This is the farthest a proposed law on SOT has gone for decades,” said Nagkaisa! “Now, it’s time to get the Senate moving on their proposed SOT measure.”

“HB 6908 gives more flesh and blood to the guaranteed right to security of tenure,” Nagkaisa! said. “It’s not perfect or ideal, but we can live with it,” said Nagkaisa!, the largest labor coalition in the country.

Fear of employers allayed

Nagkaisa! also addressed fears of employers who went on record saying that they will have a “big problem” if the proposed measure was passed. “If the big problem employers have about HB 6908 refers to the potential cutbacks in the windfall of profits a number of employers have been amassing through the massive abuse of workers via contractualization for decades, the bill intends to do just that,” Nagkaisa! said. “Employers who do not abuse workers through contractualization have nothing to fear,” Nagkaisa! added.

“Never in the history of employment relationship in the country has workers enjoying regular employment and implementation of strict rules in labor contracting been detrimental to the economy and job generation,” Nagakaisa! said.

“Job generation is a function of the development of sectors of the economy influenced by economic policies of the government, and not by labor contracting practices,” Nagkaisa explained.

A “serious problem” employers noted is that if the SOT bill becomes a law, it will be detrimental to the economy and job creation. Nagksaisa! countered the argument. “Workers with regular employment generate more income, thus, with more purchasing power contribute to increasing demand in goods and services that lead to higher income taxes and VAT for the government. These are all good for the economy,” said Nagkaisa.

“The fear that the HB can lead to unemployment is only possible if they are not paying their contractual employees what the law currently demands. In other words, their argument is an admission that they are doing business at the expense of workers’ rights – and they want to continue doing so,” Nagkaisa! added.

The recent statement by the employers didn’t specify which provisions of the bill they strongly disagree with.

Nagkaisa! said it was grateful to Labor Committee Chair Rep. Randolph Ting who steered the discussions and Rep. Raymond Mendoza of TUCP Partylist and Rep. Tom Villarin of Akbayan Partylist who co-authored the SOT Bill and helped defend it together with Nagkaisa.

SENTRO calls on Working People to Sustain the Call to End Contractualization, Stop Authoritarian Policies

Photo by RBanares

MANILA, Philippines (May 1, 2017) – The national labor center Sentro ng Nagkakaisa at Progresibong Manggagawa (Center for United and Progressive Workers), or SENTRO, calls on the working people to continue the struggle against contractualization and the precariousness of living, “sustained by the Duterte’s regime biased for the elite.”

In a rally this morning in conjunction with the 130thglobal Labor Day commemoration, the 100,000-strong SENTRO criticized the “fake news” that contractualization is over. According to SENTRO Secretary General Josua Mata, “We gave Pres. Duterte the benefit of the doubt on his promise to end the oppressive policy of labor contractualization, in hoping that Pres. Duterte will dismantle and replace the much-criticized Department Order No. 18-A.” He said their hopes were met with grim disillusionment with Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello’s release of DO No. 174 last March 19, 2017.

Mata stated that DO 174 will perpetuate contractualization by: a) allowing businesses to hire workers through agencies; b) allowing cooperatives to engage in labor contracting and subcontracting; c) no longer requiring the principal employer to provide unions a copy of the service contract; and d) allowing contracting agencies to further downplay the price of labor costs—guaranteeing even lower salaries and benefits for workers across industries. “Clearly, DO 174 widely differs from what Pres. Duterte has promised,” said Mata.

SENTRO assailed the President from being only true to its promise to kill, and to bury the late dictator Marcos at the Heroes Cemetery. In a statement, SENTRO noted that in almost 365 days in Malacañang, the President’s hands are bloodied in calling on the police, and later jobless migrant workers to kill drug users. However, it failed to deliver genuine resolution of the drug problem as it allows the escape of drug traffickers like Peter Lim.

SENTRO marched from Welcome Rotonda and converged with the 10,000 marchers of NAGKAISA Coalition to push Pres. Duterte to prioritize the prohibition of all forms of contractualization by supplanting DO 174 with an Executive Order and by certifying as urgent the passage of HB4444.

Allies from human rights groups such as iDEFEND, the World March of Women, and students marched with the workers to call on all “freedom-loving Filipinos to stand up and be counted in the fight for regular and sustainable jobs, to stop the killings, block Duterte’s Death Policies – the reimposition of the death penalty and the lowering of the age of criminality – and to resist moves to amend the constitution to institute “constitutional authoritarianism.” The march followed a coffin with a chick on top, a derivation from a Filipino custom, hoping that the deaths will stop immediately.

“Let us assert our basic right to a dignified and genuinely safe society—not the selective security of the privileged that preys on the massacre of the poor,” added Mata.

SENTRO vows to continue the struggle against contractualization

Photo by JTMata

Sentro ng mga Nagkakaisa at Progresibong Manggagawa joins the global working peoples in their 130th commemoration of International Labor Day. Filipino workers have been commemorating the International Labor Day and the continuing struggles of the working masses since 1903, inextricably tying it to the anti-colonial struggle. Faced as it is by monumental challenges and massive societal roadblocks, SENTRO remains undaunted and steadfast in its commitment towards organizing, fighting and winning on behalf of the working peoples of the Philippines.

In less than a year, President Rodrigo Duterte has seen his popularity and trust ratings erode by 7% and 11% among the working poor. While a number of the population remains unperturbed by this, this development is an indicator that a significant section of our people is beginning to fear for their lives— and perhaps even regretting their complicity to the election of an unrepentant violator of human rights and democratic institutions.

The working people gave Pres. Duterte the benefit of the doubt on his promise to end the oppressive policy of labor contractualization. We hoped that Pres. Duterte will dismantle and replace the much-criticized Department Order No. 18-A. But our hopes were met with grim disillusionment with Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello’s release of Department Order No. 174 last March 19, 2017.

This policy will perpetuate contractualization by: a) allowing businesses to hire workers through agencies; b) allowing cooperatives to engage in labor contracting and subcontracting; c) no longer requiring the principal employer to provide unions a copy of the service contract; and d) allowing contracting agencies to further downplay the price of labor costs—guaranteeing even lower salaries and benefits for workers across industries. Clearly, DO 174 widely differs from what Pres. Duterte has promised.

Truth is, the Duterte regime is only consistent in one thing: it wants to kill, and the freedom to kill who it wants to kill. The spate of extrajudicial killings occurring all over the country—ostensibly sponsored and abetted by the Philippine National Police’s Oplan Tokhang and Oplan Double Barrel—has claimed anywhere between 8,000 to 10,000 lives already. This has worsened the situation of poor women, leaving them in trauma, isolation and greater vulnerability to further abuse such as prostitution. In addition to this,the Philippine Congress reintroduces the death penalty,and was passed by the House of Representatives last March 7, 2017, awaiting advancement in the Philippine Senate—despite the Philippines’ international commitment to treaties not to do so. Another legislative bill intends to lower the minimum age of criminal liability to nine (9) years of age, pushing back the victory in the past of children’s rights groups.

It is probably not without reason that this culture of death has been roundly condemned by the international community. The “War on the Poor,” as it is, has made a mockery of its initial propaganda to rid us of the menace of drug dependence and promote a secure, living society. While the poor is being killed, the drug profiteers like Peter Lim are left scot-free.

As expected, the elites are in no hurry to oppose or even modulate the Duterte regime’s reign of terror and death. Many of these politicians have kowtowed to Malacañang, probably in anticipation of the impending push for charter change, which may see the Philippines parcelled around longstanding political dynasties and the further dismantling of the country’s economic infrastructure through their hard-selling of Federalism.

Once again, it is up to the working people and their labor movement to defend our rights, even as we continue to deepen democracy in the country. It is for this reason that SENTRO, together with its allies amongst the progressive forces, is calling on all freedom-loving Filipinos to stand up and be counted in the fight to stop the killings, block Duterte’s Death Policies – the reimposition of the death penalty and the lowering of the age of criminality – and to resist moves to amend the constitution to institute “constitutional authoritharianism.” SENTRO believes that workers’ and trade union rights cannot genuinely exist if human and democratic rights are compromised and thrown to the gutter.

We call on the working people to continue the struggle against contractualization and the precariousness of living sustained by the Duterte regime’s neo-liberal policies. Let us assert our basic right to a dignified and genuinely safe society—not the selective security of the privileged that preys on the massacre of the poor.

Organize! Fight! Win!

Download FIlipino version of the statement

Rules Allowing Agency Hiring Rejected Anew by Workers Groups

The anticipated new Department Order (D.O.) on endo is finally out for issuance today. But rejection can only be the immediate response of organized labor for the kind of rules that speak about prohibiting contractualization but ends up allowing agency hiring in many forms.

The Labor Secretary has ignored the overwhelming demand of trade unions and workers’ associations to prohibit contractualization since the previous administrations and which the groups continue to articulate in all official consultative processes called for by the DOLE and national tripartite conferences from the beginning of the Duterte Administration.

The President then was very clear: “Ayoko sa agency agency, wala na dapat itong agency agency,” declared the President during the labor dialogue last February 27. The labor movement, likewise, was very insistent: The current policy is a failure, thus, the government must now shift to prohibition.

Workers were demanding prohibition on contractualization based on the following grounds:

The current policy of “allow then regulate” has failed the workers and this nation. A country of endos is a nation of poor, violated, and voiceless people.

It is immoral as it allows employers to save on labor cost and avoid having direct responsibility to their workers while their middlemen (agencies and cooperatives) earn profit from the same exploitative trading transaction.

It is anti-labor because it violates all the fundamental rights of labor.

It is anti-development as it exacerbates poverty and deepens inequality in our country.

By ensuring continuity and stability of agency hiring, the new D.O. will never put an end but rather perpetuate the epidemic of contractualization.

1. It prohibits labor-only-contracting (LOC) and the cabo system which is already prohibited by law anyway;

2. While it prohibits the contractualization of jobs directly related to main business and subject to control of principal, interpretation disputes shall mean expensive an wearisome litigations in DOLE, NLRC and the courts;

3. Only in-house agencies and labor cooperatives are not allowed to operate. Independent contractors are permitted;

4. The DO opens floodgates to agencies to set up shops. This will enhance cutthroat competition among contractors bidding down salaries and benefits of their employees;

5. The more contractuals the country will have, the harder to monitor and regulate. DOLE’s inspection capacity is a chronic problem that also has to be addressed.

It is still a sad day for workers. But the struggle continues. It’s time for a full court press and nationwide actions. We thus demand that Pres. Duterte issue an Executive Order in place of this bad order and certify as an urgent measure HB4444 that seeks the prohibition of contractualization and the criminalization of such offense

PRESS STATEMENT
NAGKAISA
17 March 2017
Contact: Ka Rene Magtubo, Spokesperson
09178532905

DOLE must enforce ‘prohibit order’ on contractualization

President Rodrigo Duterte’s marching orders are clear: Stop contractualization! No agency hiring!

Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III received these marching orders from the President during the labor dialogue last Monday.  He was instructed to work on a new draft Department Order and to address the related plea of PALEA on outsourcing.

“As the alter ego of the President, Sec. Bello is hard pressed to comply with the order and to abide with the demand of workers without further delay,” said Nagkaisa chairman, Michael Mendoza.

Through a symbolic pressing of time button, the group declared a 30-day countdown for DOLE to come up with new rules prohibiting contractualization.

Junk win-win

The group noted that the latest draft of the issuance, distributed in January, still reflects the DTI and employers formula of legitimizing manpower agencies and regulating their practices.

“In the light of the President’s latest instructions, Sec. Bello should junk its draft and adopt Nagkaisa’s proposed DO, which seeks prohibition of contractualization, as the new working draft,” added Mendoza

On orders of the President, Sec. Bello is to convene the Tripartite Industrial Peace Council (TIPC) to discuss the new draft order. The TIPC, composed of workers and employers representatives serves as the clearinghouse of all labor polices, with the power to endorse proposed issuances to the DOLE Secretary.

“Should there be another deadlock at this level, we will expect the Secretary to decide along the line of prohibition agreed upon at the Palace,” stressed Mendoza.

The coalition is likewise hopeful that HB4444 authored by Rep, Raymond Mendoza of the TUCP Partylist, which seeks total prohibition and criminalization of contractualization offenses, will gain ground in Congress once certified by the President.

Once contractualization is finally prohibited, the rights of workers to security of tenure, to unionize and bargain collectively will be restored.

However, Mendoza called on workers to continue working together and be vigilant as the enemies of the working class will surely find ways to prevent workers from achieving total victory against contractualization and other forms of exploitation.

Women march against endo

Women make up more than half of contractual workers. Hence, led the Women’s Committee of Nagkaisa, women workers will continue to exert pressure on the DOLE to stop contractualization.

On March 6, two days before International Women’s Day, women workers will march from Plaza Salamanca to the DOLE offices in Intramuros. Among their calls are, “Sa multiple burden ko, dagdag pa ang endo”, “Sa regular jobs, may forever,” and “Endo itigil na, now na!”

Rights for public sector workers

While calling for a stop to contractualization in civil service, public sector unions has also secured a commitment from the President to ratify ILO Convention 151.

According to Annie Geron of the Public Services Independent Labor Confederation (PSLINK) which is affiliated with Public Services International (PSI), Convention 151 is an international labor standard that recognizes the rights of public sector workers to freedom of association and collective bargaining.